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dc.contributor.advisorde la Harpe, RethaEN
dc.contributor.authorChitondo, Pepukayi David Junior
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-30T06:27:41Z
dc.date.available2017-05-30T06:27:41Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11838/2479
dc.descriptionThesis (MTech (Information Technology))--Cape Peninsula University of Technology, 2016.en_US
dc.description.abstractHealth information policies are constantly becoming a key feature in directing information usage in healthcare. After the passing of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act in 2009 and the Affordable Care Act (ACA) passed in 2010, in the United States, there has been an increase in health systems innovations. Coupling this health systems hype is the current buzz concept in Information Technology, „Big data‟. The prospects of big data are full of potential, even more so in the healthcare field where the accuracy of data is life critical. How big health data can be used to achieve improved health is now the goal of the current health informatics practitioner. Even more exciting is the amount of health data being generated by patients via personal handheld devices and other forms of technology that exclude the healthcare practitioner. This patient-generated data is also known as Personal Health Records, PHR. To achieve meaningful use of PHRs and healthcare data in general through big data, a couple of hurdles have to be overcome. First and foremost is the issue of privacy and confidentiality of the patients whose data is in concern. Secondly is the perceived trustworthiness of PHRs by healthcare practitioners. Other issues to take into context are data rights and ownership, data suppression, IP protection, data anonymisation and reidentification, information flow and regulations as well as consent biases. This study sought to understand the role of data policies in the process of data utilisation in the healthcare sector with added interest on PHRs utilisation as part of big health data.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherCape Peninsula University of Technologyen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/za/
dc.subjectMedical informaticsen_US
dc.subjectSelf-care, Health -- Data processingen_US
dc.subjectPersonal information managementen_US
dc.subjectBig dataen_US
dc.subjectMedical care -- Data processingen_US
dc.subjectPublic health administration -- Data processingen_US
dc.subjectHealth services administration -- Data processingen_US
dc.titleData policies for big health data and personal health dataen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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