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dc.contributor.advisorVenter, Y., Mrs
dc.contributor.authorvan der Vyver, Rache
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-09T11:29:21Z
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-27T08:11:52Z
dc.date.available2014-04-09T11:29:21Z
dc.date.available2016-01-27T08:11:52Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11838/774
dc.descriptionThesis submitted in fulfillment of the requirements for the degree Master of Technologiae: Consumer Science: Food and Nutrition in the Faculty of Applied Sciences at the Cape Peninsula University of Technology Supervisor: Dr I Venter Co-supervisor: Ms L du Toit Cape Town September 2013en_US
dc.description.abstractObjective: To develop a valid and reliable test to determine the food knowledge of first-year students at a university of technology (UOT) in the Western Cape, South Africa. Design: Two preliminary food knowledge tests were developed covering the content domains, namely fruit and vegetables and fats and oils, as these topics attend to the areas of concern in the dietary intake of young adults. Both tests consisted of multiple-choice questions and incomplete statements compiled following the test item construction rules. The items of both tests were evaluated by experts in the field of food science and nutrition to ensure item content and face validity. Both tests were independently administered to two sample groups represented by knowledgeable students (having food-orientated subjects as part of their course) and less knowledgeable students (not having food-orientated subjects as part of their course syllabus) at a UOT in the Western Cape, SA for the item analysis and test construct validity and reliability determinations. The second preliminary test incorporating three response alternatives was developed as the number of items retained after the item analysis of the first preliminary test incorporating four alternatives was less than the envisaged number of about 20 items. Results: After the item analysis of the first preliminary test (n = 72 items) only 10 and 13 items were respectively retained after two administrations to two sample groups. The second preliminary test (n = 135 items) completed by knowledgeable (n=119) and less-knowledgeable (n=91) student sample groups delivered 74 items after its item analysis across the two content domains, namely fruit and vegetables (n=49) and fats and oils (n=25). The test was found valid, with a significant difference (p < 0.001) in the knowledge scores between the two sample groups (Mann-Whitney test, z = 9.74) and highly reliable (KR20 and Cronbach's alpha= 0.934). Conclusions: The test being a valid and reliable assessment tool can be used to determine the food knowledge of first-year students at a UOT in the Western Cape, SA, across the two content domains to establish if guidance and possible teaching is necessary to equip them with basic food knowledge to support them in their food provision.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipCape Peninsula University of Technologyen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherCape Peninsula University of Technologyen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/za/
dc.subjectFood -- Study and teaching -- South Africaen_US
dc.subjectCooking -- Study and teaching -- South Africaen_US
dc.subjectDissertations, Academicen_US
dc.subjectMTechen_US
dc.subjectTheses, dissertations, etc.en_US
dc.subjectCape Peninsula University of Technology. Faculty of Applied Sciencesen_US
dc.titleDevelopment of a food knowledge test for first-year students at a University of Technology in the Western Cape, South Africaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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